Rain, Rain, Go Away!

rain

Photo Courtesy of: codecanyon.net

If you are NOT a farmer you may have noticed that some of your outdoor plans have been cancelled due to rain…
If you ARE a farmer you may have noticed that some of your outdoor plans have been cancelled due to rain…

While we have been fortunate in our small part of the world, the majority of the areas around us have been hit very hard with LOTS of rain.  Anywhere from 5-10 inches in the last few weeks!  We know… you would think that rain would be good for crops. But, this much rain has been too much.

Dry beans are really a big worry right now. They just cannot take excessive rain. There are already talks of considerable losses in the dry bean industry. Some farmers have had to face replanting while others, with standing water, are concerned about the nitrogen that was lost in corn.

So we are praying that we get some good heat and sun to dry out the fields enough farmers can get back in to manage crops.  On our farm right now we are attempting to find dry bean ground that is dry enough to let us cultivate.  We use a row crop cultivator for weed control and for “hilling” up dirt around our beans; which makes it easier for our type of harvest.

In other Little House News we have been keeping busy cutting up some wood for our summer camping, doing some rainy summer camping, and playing with our goats.  Yesterday we also poured some cement for a bin project we are going to be working on later this summer.  I think our Faith is going to be a great Farm Mom someday, check her out raking dirt and carrying her baby  in the backpack carrier!

You Know It’s Planting Season When…

 

I ran across a picture I posted on my personal Facebook page a few years back and I’m sharing it with you today.

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We were in the midst of a very busy planting season and some how a ketchup bottle fell out of the fridge and I was so tired and busy it took me 3 days to actually get back around to cleaning it up.

It’s been a crazy planting season here but we were blessed with decent weather and our corn, soybeans and dry beans are all planted.

Here are my reflections on How You Know It’s Planting Season:

** The weather app is your new best friend or worst enemy
** Clouds induce paranoia
** Changes in weather forecast can make your farmer come unglued
** That extra Twinkie in your lunchbox can brighten your day
** The kids want to know when dad is coming back
** Everything breaks. Everything.
** The parts department at the implement dealer is on speed dial
** You measure your day in acres not hours
** If you manage to wash and dry the laundry you are too tired to put it away so you sleep under it
** Seed from the current crop are rolling all over the laundry room floor
** Tempers are short
– Like when we decided to take make a quick stop with the kids to get ice cream but on the way there the field we were waiting to get dry was ready.  There was a long line and Farmer almost came unglued.

 

God Bless the grandmas who pick up the kids, the wives who deliver hot food to the fields and hold the fort down, and the farmers and farmHers that sacrifice time with their families to feed yours.💕

 

I Lost 100 Pounds!

Seed Bags

100 Pounds of Seed

Do you see those 2 bags of seed?  They each weigh 50lbs.  We were finishing up our last field of corn Friday night and Farmer needed 2 more bags of seed so I ran back to the farm and loaded them in my car.  As I was struggling to lift one of the bags and carry it over to the planter it hit me. Right there in those bags was the 100lbs of weight I had lost and I could barely carry half of it, let alone both bags at once!

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It was a bit of a shock and also a revelation.  It has been a lot of work and commitment getting to this point and not every day has been a positive one.  But today we celebrate the positives!

** I have lost 100lbs!
** I can walk 3+ miles without stopping
**I can walk faster~ 3 minutes less per mile than when I started
** I climbed up the tractor steps this planting season with ease
** I have more energy

I have a long way to go on the journey but today I’m stopping and appreciating how far I’ve come.

What is your positive for the day?

 

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We are planting!

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We finally made it into the fields and have been working on putting our corn in the ground!! Spring planting can get a little hectic because there is the working ground (my favorite job!), picking stones, putting nitrogen down and then the actually planting. We love it though!

This year we are pulling a rolling basket behind our field cultivator to help with lumps in the soil and will hopefully make a better seed bed for our plants. Pulling onto the road can be a bit intimidating for me because it makes my equipment about 80 feet long and you need to make wide turns into the driveways to avoid putting it in the ditch…

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As I was traveling down the road last week, about 1/8th of a mile from one field to another, a pick-up truck came up behind me and as I swung wide to make a right turn into the driveway he passed me on the right!  I was pretty mad because it was VERY dangerous and also illegal.

So in the spirit of keeping my family and yours safe on the road here are a few tips when driving around farm equipment!

 

 

 

Tips for Rural Drivers

  • Always be on the lookout for farm machinery. Remember it can unexpectedly turn onto public roads from a field or driveway.
  • Farm machinery typically travels at 25 mph or less, so be prepared to slow down in order to avoid a rear-end collision.
  • Keep a safe distance. This gives better visibility to both drivers and equipment operators.
  • Allow adequate time and distance for farm equipment to make wide turns.
  • Just because you see the equipment does not mean the equipment operator sees you.

Tips for Passing Farm Machinery

  • Be sure the machinery is not turning left. Look for left turn lights or hand signals. If the machinery slows down and pulls toward the right side of the road, the operator may be preparing to make a wide left turn. Likewise, sometimes to make a wide right turn, the operator must fade to the left.
  • Determine whether the road is wide enough for both your vehicle and the farm equipment.
  • Check for roadside obstacles such as mailboxes, bridges or road signs that may cause the machinery to move to the center of the road.
  • Be sure there is adequate distance for you to safely pass and be on the lookout for oncoming traffic.

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Tips taken from: http://www.kinze.com/post.aspx?id=330